Truth or Fiction About LASIK

Posted By on Jun 26, 2018 in LASIK Surgery | 0 comments


While continually improving the technology, LASIK has been around for over 30 years. Since annually some new improvement in laser eye surgery appears in the media sometimes people get the impression that LASIK is brand new. Due to the nature of eye surgery LASIK undergoes refinements for various diseases and options. The basic procedure remains similar to what the first surgery became: a small incision in the eye made strategically to correct a vision issue. The procedure now done globally has a 96% rate of success with studies of 5 years follow-ups reporting the vision maintained.

Clarifications

LASIK remains a significant surgery, and Houston LASIK staff and ophthalmologists will make that statement. The clinic set up reflects that philosophy since staff counsels incoming patients about the procedure, so they have full information about their eye issues. Houston LASIK also offers a direct consultation with an ophthalmologist that customizes a treatment plan and educates a patient as well.  Still, some not entirely accurate lines of thinking exist that need addressing.

The first not entirely true statement:

LASIK cannot correct astigmatism.

Thirty years ago with the tool called a microkeratome, that statement was true. BUT now

with a refined laser system and increased precision astigmatism can be corrected by laser

eye surgery. Astigmatism defines as a deviation from the spherical curvature of the eye that

causes distorted images.

 

The second not entirely true statement:

              Every decade or so a person will have to have another laser eye surgery.

It depends on the eye issue dealt with, and age of the patient. Most people do not ever have

to have another procedure done. High-risk surgeries or surgery done on younger patients

may require an additional operation known as a refinement. Most have been informed of

that before the first surgery. Once becoming elderly as in 65 years or older natural aging

processes may affect vision and other procedures may be used to correct but the LASIK

improvement would remain in place.

 

The third not entirely true statement:

 Dealing with dry eye is a given after laser eye surgery.

             

Nearly all patients develop some degree of the temporary dry eye after the surgery. The issue

becomes taken care of with special eye drops. For most the dry eye issue remains minor and

disappears after about 6 months. Some patients come into the procedure with dry eye issues

and LASIK does not cure that. LASIK increases visual acuity.

 

The fourth statement not entirely true:

LASIK remains more dangerous than wearing contact lens.

             

Only an ophthalmologist can determine if LASIK will be more dangerous to the eyes than

contact lenses. For most the opposite has been true. Contact lenses can create the dry eye

condition and bacterial keratitis remains a risk for it. The surgery itself carries risk and the

postoperative period but once healing happens little risk becomes involved with LASIK.

Contact lens unless vigilant carries the risk of bacterial keratitis daily.

 

Conclusion

LASIK has a high rate of success with high patient satisfaction. Good opthalomologists go on a case by case basis. Many of the negative comments are half-truths or specific to an individuals experience. Talk to an ophthalmologist of the quality at Houston LASIK to get a full review of the facts that apply to your case.

Houston Lasik leads in providing premium LASIK technologies to Houston, Sugar Land, and the surrounding region. The center’s award-winning medical director introduced revolutionary technologies such as iLASIK to the region. This technology is used by NASA astronauts, Navy SEALS and Air Force fighter pilots. At Houston Lasik, you can now receive the same treatment. For more information, please call (281) 240-0478.

Information Via:

https://www.webmd.com/men/features/10-key-facts-to-know-about-lasik#1

https://www.eyeworld.org/article-toppling-major-myths-about-lasik

https://crstoday.com/articles/2016-jul/debunked-lasik-myths-and-misconceptions/

https://www.aao.org/eyenet/article/look-at-lasik-past-present-future

https://www.cdc.gov/contactlenses/bacterial-keratitis.html